Advertising sign on wooden postThe trouble with reading a good book about using Amazon (or Twitter or Facebook) is that by the time you’ve finished the book the platform has changed.

Amazon now has something called Themes or Browse Categories. They show up on the left whenever you start looking for fiction books. Go ahead, try it. Go to Amazon and type in “Thrillers” or “Historical Romance.” By the time I post this they may be appearing next to non-fiction books as well.

I’m told these categories on the left reflect what people are searching for in books. So the savvy marketer will use some of those phrases as Keywords for their books.

That bit of advice–and much more–came from Penny Sansivieri, the Author Marketing Expert. She appeared on a panel one night and  I went.

(Digression:  I love living in Los Angeles where every week I can find a free-or nearly-free talk that improves me as an author and marketer!  And I don’t keep these events to myself; you can find them all on the WritersCalendarLA.com. )

Moving on:

Book_JeffWalkerBeth and I are now using Launch: An Internet Millionaire’s Secret Formula To Sell Almost Anything Online, Build A Business You Love, And Live The Life Of Your Dreamsby Jeff Walker as our playbook.

It’s all about the preparation. Launch tells you how to build up a mailing list, send out enticing emails with offers that make people WANT to be on your mailing list, how to engage with potential customers–basically how to structure a product launch. The work is all in the buildup, and the launch itself (along with wildly successful sales, right?) comes at the very end.

If that interests you, we strongly suggest you get the print book so you can flip back and forth and stick post it papers all over. Beth says the videos are great and round out the information; I’m a week or two behind her so I haven’t viewed them yet.

Christmas Coffee and Book.1200.1618However, I have managed to get one of my books into a gift basket, sold with coffee by a wonderful Amazon store, Aloha Island Coffee.

And that was a lot easier than trying to read about Amazon algorithms or follow the steps for a product launch. How did I do it?

I go to a couple of writers’ group meetings regularly. One of the managers of Aloha Island Coffee also goes. She’s a very nice person, and we got to talking. That’s all.

Reminds me of the time writer John Vorhaus talked to another group, a few years ago, and mentioned that he once found himself talking to a previously unknown in-law at a family party. Turns out the in-law had recording equipment and wanted to get into recording and selling books.

John pursued the idea with this newfound relative, and now many of his mysteries (The Albuquerque Turkey) and nonfiction books (Decide to Play Great Poker: A Strategy Guide to No-limit Texas Hold Em) are audiobooks–which would not have happened otherwise.

The Lesson: For all our studying, sometimes the best marketing ideas just show up. All we have to do is talk to someone and make a connection.

THUMBNAIL_IMAGEWelcome to the Great Marketing Push of 2014. A few friends and I are going to try out the marketing strategies outlined in several books, and report on the results. Writer Beth Whittenbury (author of Just Love Him, I Guess, which I love) is also blogging about her progress, and you can follow her here.

This week, we are focusing on Amazon, but I want to say a few words about Goodreads first, because I just finished a giveaway there.

goodreadsI’ve heard that people need to see a product 3-5 times before it sinks in. Goodreads provides a couple of great ways to get your book in front of readers until it sticks:

A Book Giveaway

This is my favorite, because it’s almost free. You set up a giveaway through your author dashboard: look under the Explore tab for Giveaways. You set the dates and the number of books to offer. At the end of the contest, your only expense is the actual books you sign, and the $2 or $3 in postage.

A Paid Promotion

For as little as $90 (which is billed to a credit card at the beginning) you set up ads, and pay each time someone clicks on the ad to see more information about your book. You decide how big the ad is (a bigger ad costs a bit more per click), and you can create several ads. One might appear whenever someone searches for a certain genre; another might appear whenever someone searches for certain authors. For example, if you’ve written an epic fantasy you might select Fantasy as a genre, then do another ad that will appear whenever someone searches for Tolkien or George R.R. Martin. The promotion lasts as long as there’s money left.

attachmentMy Results

A giveaway for Death Speaker: A Novel of Ancient Gaul ran a year ago, and I think I’ll do another giveaway now. I cannot know how many people bought the book, but I do know that at least 300 saw it. Currently, 120 people have Death Speaker on their to-read list.

I also ran a promotion for Death Speaker, but I can’t say that I saw any spike in sales over the many months that it ran. I’m assured that it’s fairly normal for a promotion to go on for months. A lot of people click through during the first couple of weeks, then interest dies down.

I just wrapped up a giveaway for The Boomer Book of Christmas Memories; 500 people entered it. 215 have it on their to-read list.

amazon
On to Amazon!

I’m using two books: Lets Get Visible, by David Gaughran and Why Does My Book Not Sell, by Rayne Hall. So far, I’m pretty much in the theory section of Gaughran’s section on Amazon, rather than the practicum. I have learned that sales ranks are based solely on sales, and Top Rated lists are based on reviews/stars–but you have to meet a minimum number of reviews to qualify.

I also learned that corporate publishers get to put their books in more categories than indies (5 v. 2), which clears up a mystery I’ve wondered about. Gaughram advises studying categories and switching them judiciously to take advantage of openings. I would definitely need some practice there.

Hall’s book does not have a section on Amazon, per se, so I can’t compare. I did flip to the chapter on book reviews and read that I should ask my Beta readers for reviews, and using social media to offer a free book to anyone who will post a review. And don’t buy or trade reviews, which is good advice. Don’t get fake reviews, and don’t respond to reviews. Both books advise putting a page at the end of your ebook/book asking readers to leave reviews, pretty please, but I was hoping for a little more advice.

Maybe I should go read over Beth’s shoulder.